Big Red

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I mentioned in the previous post that I did most of my traveling around Seaside on an electric trike. This photo is of a newer model, but it is nearly exact to the trike I rode.

In my wife’s family, the trike is referred to as ‘BIG RED’. This trike will literally push you back in the seat if you are not careful. The acceleration is controlled ( I use that term loosely) by the right hand grip. It will do a wheelie if you are not very careful when you rotate the hand grip. There are two posts with small wheels on the back of the trike and they are there for a reason: to keep the trike from flipping over backwards. Most of the weight is towards the rear of the vehicle, including the driver. Makes for some harrowing moments if you are not vigilant.

The trike comes with all of the usual features: back and front hand brakes, parking brake, horn, lights, directional and gauges to let you know the battery level and speed. It comes with a key fob that allows you to set an alarm. If anyone touches the trike when the alarm is set it lets out a high pitched squeal. So, if someone thought they could lift it into a truck bed ( would probably take three people), the trike will protest!

When I took it out the first time at Seaside I needed to find a gas station with an air pump as all three tires were low. I had to drive about a mile to the nearest station. When I pulled in ( silently) there were three rough looking dudes on Harleys getting gas. I was a bit leery when I couldn’t find the air pump because that meant asking the attendant ( Oregon is the only state that won’t allow self pumping), which meant driving the trike up to the pumps where the biker dudes where. I asked the attendant quickly and then was directed to the side of the building ( where I could fill the tires out of the view of the bikers). Just one of those ‘timing is everything/ moments, I guess.

Riding around town was interesting in that people were doing a rubber neck kind of thing as I whirred by them. Three guys on Honda scooters zipped past me twice on the same street, honking their horns. Never a dull moment on Big Red.

I used the wire basket to carry a small backpack with my Nikon camera inside and there was a wire lid to lock it in place.

Top speed: 40+ kph!

So, that was my experience with BIG RED.

Safe travels

from the Mothership

docked in Seattle!!

More from Central Oregon

Reading on the Mothership, our granddaughter misses some of the sights as we travel across Central Oregon. Needless to say, she is an avid reader ( voracious, maybe). I think that is her brother’s foot sticking up on the left. I guess I kind of got him in the shot.

Safe travels

from the Mothership

docked in Seattle!

From Prairie City to John Day, OR.

Just some shots from the cockpit of the Mothership as we made our way from Prairie City to John Day. The Fossil Center was really busy the morning we were there, but we did get a chance to see all of the exhibits, just not go out on the trail or whatever to see the actual beds. Just keeping track of two grandchildren, when I’m in a boot and need a cane to navigate, was a challenge enough indoors!

As an aside: the motorhome you see in the photo we seemed to have followed for a couple of hours. Not much traffic on this road, which is nice. Just a bit boring looking at the back of the same motorhome for miles!

 

Safe travels

from the Mothership

docked in Seattle!

Leaving Prairie City, OR.

The morning routine of packing, cleaning and unhooking from water, electric and waste lines. Making sure the site is clean as when we found it. We drove from Prairie City to John Day to check out the fossils ( next post). Wasn’t much traffic as we drove across central Oregon.

Safe travels

from the Mothership

docked and winterized

in Seattle!

 

Prairie City, OR.

After leaving Weiser, ID. we drove to Prairie City, OR. The campsite was on the grounds of the local museum and adjacent to a pasture of sorts and a cemetery. It was nice to have full hookups after dry camping in Weiser. As we drove across central Oregon the haze from forest fires was everywhere, it seemed. We had our grandkids with us so they kept us on our toes. There favorite spot was the cemetery across the street. I had to corral them before dusk as they wanted to read every headstone. Burial sites dating back to Civil War days. The cemetery was located across a narrow road and was the highest point in the area. The dead got the best real estate!

Safe Travels

from the Mothership

docked in Seattle!

Weiser, ID. Festivities

Our camping neighbors for a couple of days on the playground of Pioneer Elementary School, serious astronomers. The biggest house ( that we saw) in Weiser and a bit of the Eclipse Festivities. The population of the town is @ 4,000. The weekend of the Eclipse Festival it easily doubled, which made for an interesting exit from town!

Making our way to Weiser, ID.

Leaving Benton City and the Klipsun Cottage. Views along the road, some spectacular and some sad. One place that we have now driven through twice without stopping is Lime, OR. in Baker County, OR. The geology of the area is fascinating. The abandoned cement plant looks like a great place to explore and take photos. It is officially a Ghost Town. If you check the link above and subsequent link to the page that lists those towns of Oregon, you’ll find details.

As manufacturing and mining raw materials has gone from our country to ‘developing’ countries, the small towns that housed the employees of those companies have been deserted, leaving a ghostly presence. We saw a lot of that in 2016 when we drove back to Peoria, ILL and then made our way back to the SW via I-40 and old Route 66. I think, until you get out there and drive the country, you don’t really see the full impact of political and economic decisions made by corporate America in the past 50 years. It’s not a subject you will see on the evening news or even news magazine-like shows on TV. It’s not an uplifting story, what happens to workers who move to these remote places to find employment, only to have the company chase the raw materials or cheaper labor to other countries; it’s a race to the bottom and our fellow citizens are just a  disposal resource to Politicians and the corporations that line their pockets. Working in tandem for decades that have methodically stripped this country of its ability to support itself with the materials/ skill and even infrastructure ( to some extent) to be self sustaining as a nation. Drive around the country for a month or two, get off of the Interstate Highway System and see what is really out there, beyond the strip malls of fast food and convenient gas stations.

We all live in bubbles and our perceptions are formed through the lens of those bubbles/personal experience. If you can, step out of your bubble. Dare to venture beyond the asphalt arteries that crisscross this country. You’ll find out something about America first hand, something that may alter your perception of life in America.

Both times we have driven right by/through Lime, OR. I have felt a nagging thought in my head: I really need to stop and get a good feel for this town and what took place here. I’m just as guilty of racing from one perceived destination to another and not taking the time to explore. The times I have pulled off of the Interstate system and gone on the secondary and tertiary roads I’ve been rewarded to such a rich history of the people of this country.

Didn’t sit down to write an essay or screed, but it appears something inside needed getting out.

Travel safe and be adventurous, the two aren’t mutually exclusive!

From the Mothership

docked in Seattle!