Rock Springs, Wyoming

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The Mothership docked in the Old Town section of Rock Springs, Wyoming. Across the street is the old town hall, which is now a  museum. Really cool, stone building.

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Walnut Canyon, AZ. : Pt. 1

Thought I would do a couple of posts on Walnut Canyon in Arizona. The National Park Service ‘runs’ the park. To this date, no one has determined who the original inhabitants of the canyon were. As you descend the canyon there are many cliff side ‘dwellings’. The public has access to some of them, on the trail. There are many more dwellings along the canyon walls that there is no access.

Building livable areas in a canyon is a lot of work; I can only think that at some point in the past the people who developed this site, had the resources and know-how to survive in this rocky terrain. Hiking the canyon trail was work, so living their and literally carving out an existence is hard to fathom. Unlike Pueblo Cliff dwellings, you descend into the space where at this time, there is no arable land. The river that runs through the canyon floor now is not much more than a trickle, but in centuries past it might have been a roaring source of water and game. The desert area above the canyon might have been part of a more moderate climate which would supply additional game and perhaps growing opportunities. All speculation at this point. I, however, think this site is very ancient and it presents some interesting relics that spark speculation, which you will see in my next post.

All for today.

Safe travels

from the Mothership

docked in Seattle.

Texola. OK.

In the previous post I mentioned the Vice show, Abandoned, and that they did a piece on Route 66. One of the ghost towns ( my description) they stopped at and chatted with a resident was Texola, OK. Waterhole#2 was where they interviewed the owner and perhaps last remaining resident.

While we were stopped and I was walking around shooting, there were actually two other photographers getting in and out of cars, taking photos. It was nearly 100 degrees so I was trying to get the images as fast as I could. The town just 7 miles to the east is called Erick and it was one step away from ghostliness, too. This stretch of Route 66 is pretty cool as you can pass through a few places like Texola before you run out of good road and are forced to get back on I 40.

I’ll post more images from Texola on Friday. I think it is a place worth looking at and perhaps seeing what happens when the past collides with the future; Texola can be seen as the debris from that collision, in some sense.

Safe travels

from the Mothership

docked in Seattle!

Views from the Cockpit-Discover Hidden Treasures.

Some of the sights along the highway in the SW. One constant of the Route 66 highway/drive ( or what is left of it, which is little) is abandoned properties, commercial and residential. Driving along I 40, which at times, runs parallel to the Old 66, there are glimpses of the past. I have quite a few images like some of the above. In some sense it is depressing to see, but also a fascinating look at our past that hasn’t been erased by gentrification or ……..Literally, there are abandoned properties too numerous to count.

The Boron Museum/Plant, which manufactures Boraxo, is in the middle of the Mojave Desert, in the middle of seemingly nowhere.

Safe travels

from the Mothership

docked in Seattle.