Lake Crescent: Pt. 2

Just a couple more images of Lake Crescent. Multilayered cloud formations were fun to watch as they pass over the lake.

Our grandson, Elliott, having a little fun with me :-).

Safe Travels

from the Mothership

docked in Seattle!!

Advertisements

Big Red

ems48

I mentioned in the previous post that I did most of my traveling around Seaside on an electric trike. This photo is of a newer model, but it is nearly exact to the trike I rode.

In my wife’s family, the trike is referred to as ‘BIG RED’. This trike will literally push you back in the seat if you are not careful. The acceleration is controlled ( I use that term loosely) by the right hand grip. It will do a wheelie if you are not very careful when you rotate the hand grip. There are two posts with small wheels on the back of the trike and they are there for a reason: to keep the trike from flipping over backwards. Most of the weight is towards the rear of the vehicle, including the driver. Makes for some harrowing moments if you are not vigilant.

The trike comes with all of the usual features: back and front hand brakes, parking brake, horn, lights, directional and gauges to let you know the battery level and speed. It comes with a key fob that allows you to set an alarm. If anyone touches the trike when the alarm is set it lets out a high pitched squeal. So, if someone thought they could lift it into a truck bed ( would probably take three people), the trike will protest!

When I took it out the first time at Seaside I needed to find a gas station with an air pump as all three tires were low. I had to drive about a mile to the nearest station. When I pulled in ( silently) there were three rough looking dudes on Harleys getting gas. I was a bit leery when I couldn’t find the air pump because that meant asking the attendant ( Oregon is the only state that won’t allow self pumping), which meant driving the trike up to the pumps where the biker dudes where. I asked the attendant quickly and then was directed to the side of the building ( where I could fill the tires out of the view of the bikers). Just one of those ‘timing is everything/ moments, I guess.

Riding around town was interesting in that people were doing a rubber neck kind of thing as I whirred by them. Three guys on Honda scooters zipped past me twice on the same street, honking their horns. Never a dull moment on Big Red.

I used the wire basket to carry a small backpack with my Nikon camera inside and there was a wire lid to lock it in place.

Top speed: 40+ kph!

So, that was my experience with BIG RED.

Safe travels

from the Mothership

docked in Seattle!!

Before we launch this year.

Just doing some repairs before we launch this year. The step up on the drivers side of the cab had become dislodged from its bracket. My wife’s nephew was able to reattach it with a carriage bolt so that is ready to go. The next project, with the help of the same nephew, will be to install a retractable coach step. Coachmen’s design didn’t include a step up into the coach itself. We have bee using a small, foldable step stool. It’s small, not very stable, so I felt it was time to try some after market step. Most of the best after market items can be found on Etrailer.com. They are great to work with and have quite an inventory of parts. The step should be here in a few days as it comes from their headquarters in Missouri. The step will have to be strengthened with additional pieces of steel on each side to spread the weight of the load over the width of the bracket mount. Will post some before and after photos after it is done. Sometimes you have to get creative to make changes! Having bone issues, I’m excited to have a solid step to use to enter the coach.

Safe travels

From the Mothership

Docked in Seattle!

 

Twilight in Idaho

The night before the eclipse there were some clouds hanging about. The sky turned this color, sort of a prelude to the celestial magic that was to occur the following morning.

Note: It took me about a dozen attempts to capture the actual color of the sky/clouds. My daughter is my witness as she was standing next to me asking: ‘Did you get it”? The pressure was on as the light was fading, to find the right camera setting.

Safe travels

fromThe Mothership

Docked in Seattle!

Making our way to Weiser, ID.

Leaving Benton City and the Klipsun Cottage. Views along the road, some spectacular and some sad. One place that we have now driven through twice without stopping is Lime, OR. in Baker County, OR. The geology of the area is fascinating. The abandoned cement plant looks like a great place to explore and take photos. It is officially a Ghost Town. If you check the link above and subsequent link to the page that lists those towns of Oregon, you’ll find details.

As manufacturing and mining raw materials has gone from our country to ‘developing’ countries, the small towns that housed the employees of those companies have been deserted, leaving a ghostly presence. We saw a lot of that in 2016 when we drove back to Peoria, ILL and then made our way back to the SW via I-40 and old Route 66. I think, until you get out there and drive the country, you don’t really see the full impact of political and economic decisions made by corporate America in the past 50 years. It’s not a subject you will see on the evening news or even news magazine-like shows on TV. It’s not an uplifting story, what happens to workers who move to these remote places to find employment, only to have the company chase the raw materials or cheaper labor to other countries; it’s a race to the bottom and our fellow citizens are just a  disposal resource to Politicians and the corporations that line their pockets. Working in tandem for decades that have methodically stripped this country of its ability to support itself with the materials/ skill and even infrastructure ( to some extent) to be self sustaining as a nation. Drive around the country for a month or two, get off of the Interstate Highway System and see what is really out there, beyond the strip malls of fast food and convenient gas stations.

We all live in bubbles and our perceptions are formed through the lens of those bubbles/personal experience. If you can, step out of your bubble. Dare to venture beyond the asphalt arteries that crisscross this country. You’ll find out something about America first hand, something that may alter your perception of life in America.

Both times we have driven right by/through Lime, OR. I have felt a nagging thought in my head: I really need to stop and get a good feel for this town and what took place here. I’m just as guilty of racing from one perceived destination to another and not taking the time to explore. The times I have pulled off of the Interstate system and gone on the secondary and tertiary roads I’ve been rewarded to such a rich history of the people of this country.

Didn’t sit down to write an essay or screed, but it appears something inside needed getting out.

Travel safe and be adventurous, the two aren’t mutually exclusive!

From the Mothership

docked in Seattle!

Seaside Slough

A marker honoring those who served and a glimpse of the slough as it curves its way around the town. Since we were in Seaside during the week of July 4th it seemed appropriate to acknowledge past veterans.

A week from  today we are casting off the lines of the Mothership and taking a journey to Weiser, ID. to view the eclipse . Very scenic area along the Oregon/Idaho border and the Snake River. We will be there three days, dry camping ( kind of roughing it) along with a horde of other folks headed to that area to view the eclipse for 2:07 minutes!

Safe travels

from the Mothership!

PS: my apologies for a less than exciting blog this summer. I hope the Idaho voyage will make up for things. Health issues have impacted daily life as well as travel plans.