Elk City, OK.

Elk City, OK. is home to the official Route 66 Museum. Although it was a hot, humid morning we spent a couple of hours walking around the exhibits, both indoor and outdoor. The museum is set up like an old, pre-1900’s town, complete with a funeral home, one room school house, etc.

Safe travels

from the Mothership

docked in Seattle!

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Texola Redux

A few more images from Texola, OK. Nature definitely has a way of reclaiming space. If you click on the image of the Mechanic sign you will see a guy walking between the buildings. This guy was the only living being we saw. I think he lives in the trailer next to the abandoned building.

Safe travels

from the Mothership

docked in stormy Seattle!

Texola. OK.

In the previous post I mentioned the Vice show, Abandoned, and that they did a piece on Route 66. One of the ghost towns ( my description) they stopped at and chatted with a resident was Texola, OK. Waterhole#2 was where they interviewed the owner and perhaps last remaining resident.

While we were stopped and I was walking around shooting, there were actually two other photographers getting in and out of cars, taking photos. It was nearly 100 degrees so I was trying to get the images as fast as I could. The town just 7 miles to the east is called Erick and it was one step away from ghostliness, too. This stretch of Route 66 is pretty cool as you can pass through a few places like Texola before you run out of good road and are forced to get back on I 40.

I’ll post more images from Texola on Friday. I think it is a place worth looking at and perhaps seeing what happens when the past collides with the future; Texola can be seen as the debris from that collision, in some sense.

Safe travels

from the Mothership

docked in Seattle!

Views from the Cockpit-Discover Hidden Treasures.

Some of the sights along the highway in the SW. One constant of the Route 66 highway/drive ( or what is left of it, which is little) is abandoned properties, commercial and residential. Driving along I 40, which at times, runs parallel to the Old 66, there are glimpses of the past. I have quite a few images like some of the above. In some sense it is depressing to see, but also a fascinating look at our past that hasn’t been erased by gentrification or ……..Literally, there are abandoned properties too numerous to count.

The Boron Museum/Plant, which manufactures Boraxo, is in the middle of the Mojave Desert, in the middle of seemingly nowhere.

Safe travels

from the Mothership

docked in Seattle.

All About Transportation

Route 66 is all about the movement of people from the Midwest ( Chicago) to Santa Monica. Each section of the road has its own history, but overall it is all about transportation. From the 1950’s-1960’s you might have seen all of the above traveling along the Mother of All Highways.

People used Route 66 for vacation, economic reasons or just the need to see/travel because you can: as the saying goes, ‘Not all who wander are lost’. Whether it was to get out of dustbowl Oklahoma or away from the cement jungle of Chicago, Route 66 was there to entice and accommodate all dreams and dreamers. Part of what Route 66 means to me is a time when America didn’t take itself so seriously, as it seems to today. There was still an element of an identity search going on as a nation. We hadn’t yet become jaded by all of the events that were to follow in the 60’s. A bit of nostalgia now, I guess. The age of the family owned diner, service stations that actually performed a service, pre-strip mall America was a different place.

When I was a kid I loved watching the TV show, Route 66. I still like to view those old Black and White shows today. It’s just as important to know where you came from as to where you are going.